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James Raymo

James M. Raymo

Ph.D., University of Michigan
Professor, Department of Sociology
jraymo@ssc.wisc.edu
http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~jraymo


The Family Context of Work at Older Ages

In one line of work, I focus on the well-being of older Japanese men and women. To date, my work on this project has focused on relationships between work and health and relationships between family structure and health at older ages. Currently, I am in early stages of extending this work to focus on relationships between local area characteristics and individual health outcomes - a focus that is motivated by evidence of substantial and growing regional variation in population age structure. Because geographic patterns of population aging in Japan differ in important ways from those in the U.S., this project will also involve comparative analyses using data from the Health and Retirement Study. Research objectives include: (1) examination of linkages between local population age composition and multiple dimensions of health status, (2) examination of linkages between local population age composition and health trajectories across older ages, and (3) examination of the extent to which relationships documented in (1) and (2) are sensitive to treatment of the characteristics of surrounding communities. Two overarching goals of this project are the description of cross-regional variation in relationships between local area age composition and health and the identification of local area characteristics that link age composition and health outcomes (e.g., health care access, employment opportunities, amenities).

In another line of work, I focus on the retirement process and later-life well-being of older Americans using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Currently, this project has two major components, both of which take advantage of fact that participants in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study have been followed from adolescence through age 65. In the first, I have examined linkages between work experiences across the life course (especially exposure to precarious employment and "bad jobs") and the timing and nature of retirement. In the second, I use an innovative method for characterizing trajectories of work and family experience across the life course and examine how these trajectories are related to multiple measures of health and financial well-being at older ages. The research objectives of this project are: (1) identifying the extent to which work and family trajectories across the life course affect physical and mental health, financial well-being, and changes in those outcomes during later adulthood, (2) examining the extent to which more temporally proximate factors mediate relationships between work and family trajectories across the life course and physical and mental health, financial well-being, and changes in those outcomes, and (3) assessing whether and how work and family trajectories across the life course may affect the health and financial well-being of men and women differently.



Representative Publications
Halpern-Manners, A., Warren, R.J., & Raymo, J.M. (2015). The Impact of Work and Family Trajectories on Economic Well-being at Older Ages. Social Force, 2-39.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1093/sf/sov005

Warren, J.R., Halpern-Manners, A., Liying L., Raymo, J.M., & Palloni, A. (2015). Do Different Methods for Modeling Age-Graded Trajectories Yield Consistent and Valid Results? American Journal of Sociology, 120, 1809-1856.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1086/681962

Warren, J. R., Liying, L., Halpern-Manners, A., Raymo, J. M., & Palloni, A. (2015). Do different methods for modeling age-graded trajectories yield consistent and valid results. American Journal of Sociology, 120(6), 1809-1856.

Vogelsang, E., & Raymo, J. M. (2014). Local-Area Age Structure and Population Composition: Implications for Elderly Health in Japan Journal of Aging and Health, 26(2), 155-177.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1177/0898264313504456

Raymo, J. M., Warren, J.R., Sweeney, M.M., Hauser, R.M., & Ho, J.-H. (2011). Precarious Employment, Bad Jobs, Labor Unions, and Early Retirement. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 66B(2), 249-259.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1093/geronb/gbq106

Raymo, J.M., Mencarini, L., Iwasawa, M., & Moriizumi, R. (2010). Intergenerational proximity and the fertility intentions of married women: A Japan-Italy comparison. Asian Population Studies, 6(2), 193-214.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1080/17441730.2010.494445

Raymo, J.M., Warren, J.R., Sweeney, M.M., Hauser, R.M., & Ho, J.H. (2010). Later-life employment preferences and outcomes: The role of mid-life work experiences. Research on Aging, 32, 419-466.
Click here to download this publication.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1177/0164027510361462

Kubicek, B., Korunka, C., Hoonaker, P., & Raymo, J.M. (2010). Work and family characteristics as predictors of early retirement in married men and women. Research on Aging, 32, 467-498.
Click here to download this publication.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1177/0164027510364120

Coursolle, K., Sweeney, M.M., Raymo, J.M., & Ho, J.-H. (2010). The Association Between Retirement and Emotional Wellbeing: Does Prior Work-Family Conflict Matter? Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 65B(5), 609-620.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1093/geronb/gbp116

Ho, J., & Raymo, J.M. (2009). Expectations and realization of joint retirement among dual-worker couples. Research on Aging, 31, 153-179.
Click here to download this publication.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1177/0164027508328308

Raymo, J.M., Liang, S., & Kobayashi, E., Sugihara, Y., & Fukaya, T. (2009). Work, health, and family at older ages in Japan. Research on Aging, 31, 180-206.
Click here to download this publication.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1177/0164027508328309

Raymo, J.M., Iwasawa, M., & Larry Bumpass. (2009). Cohabitation and family formation in Japan. Demography, 46(4), 785-803.

Raymo, J.M., Liang, J., Kobayashi, E., Sugihara, Y., & Fukaya, T. (2009). The family context of health and retirement in Japan. Research on Aging, 31, 180-206.

Raymo, J.M., Kikuzawa, S., Liang, J., & Kobayashi, E. (2008). Family structure and well-being at older ages in Japan. Journal of Population Research, 25(3), 379-400.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1007/BF03033896

Raymo, J.M., & Sweeney, M.M. (2006). Work-family conflict and retirement preferences. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 61B, S161-S169.

Raymo, J.M., Liang, J., Sugisawa, H., Kobayashi, E., & Sugihara, Y. (2004). Work at older ages in Japan: Variation by gender and employment status. Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 59B, S154-S163.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1093/geronb/59.3.S154

Raymo, J.M., & Xie, Y. (2000). Temporal and regional variation in the strength of educational homogamy. (Comment on Smits, Ultee, and Lammers, ASR 1998). American Sociological Review, 65, 773-781.

Raymo, J.M., & Xie, Y. (2000). Income of the urban elderly in post-reform China: Human capital, political capital, and the state. Social Science Research, 29, 1-24.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1006/ssre.1999.0649

Raymo, J.M., & Cornman, J.C. (1999). Labor force status transitions at older ages in the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand: 1970-1990. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 14, 221-244.
View publication via DOI: DOI:10.1023/A:1006680525538

Raymo, J.M., & Cornman, J.C. (1999). Trends in labor force status across the life course in Taiwan: 1970-1990. In Emerging social economic welfare programs for aging in Taiwan in a world context. Taipei, Taiwan: Academia Sinica Press.

Raymo, J.M. (1998). Later marriages or fewer? Changes in the marital behavior of Japanese women. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 60, 1023-1034.

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